association

The National Rifle Association has been taking a low profile when it comes to the firearms freedom acts that have been passed by seven state legislatures and spawned a growing legal fight between those states, some gun advocates and the U.S. Justice Department.

The firearms freedom act was first launched last year in the Montana Legislature, pushed by local gun advocates. The law states that guns made and sold within a state’s borders are exempt from federal gun control under Congress’ authority to regulate interstate commerce.

Full Story – HERE

The states that have enacted the firearms freedom act so far:

  • Montana
  • Idaho
  • Wyoming
  • South Dakota
  • Utah
  • Arizona
  • Tennessee

I previously reported on the Firearms freedom act in the following two posts:

Firearms Freedom Act – So NFA rules do not apply?

ATF laughs at your Firearms Freedom Act

What are your thoughts?  Are you disappointed that the NRA so far isn’t stepping up?

More info on the Firearms Freedom Act – HERE

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I don’t normally wear t-shirts, but for this one I’ll make an exception:

Though, if anyone asks me if it’s “Ed Hardy”, I’m going to say “But it ain’t even got no skulls, fuggetaboutit!” and then never wear the shirt again. :P

Available at the NRA Store – HERE (I hope they ship quickly!)

Hat Tip: Linoge

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The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program, NRA’s groundbreaking gun accident prevention course for children, has surpassed yet another milestone by reaching its 23 millionth child.

The purpose of the Eddie Eagle Program isn’t to teach whether guns are good or bad, but rather to promote the protection and safety of children. The program makes no value judgments about firearms, and no firearms are ever used in the program. Like swimming pools, electrical outlets, matchbooks and household poison, they’re treated simply as a fact of everyday life. With firearms found in about half of all American households, it’s a stance that makes sense.

Eddie Eagle is never shown touching a firearm, and he does not promote firearm ownership or use. The program prohibits the use of Eddie Eagle mascots anywhere that guns are present. The Eddie Eagle Program has no agenda other than accident prevention — ensuring that children stay safe should they encounter a gun. The program never mentions the NRA. Nor does it encourage children to buy guns or to become NRA members. The NRA does not receive any appropriations from Congress, nor is it a trade organization. It is not affiliated with any firearm or ammunition manufacturers or with any businesses that deal in guns and ammunition.  (Source: National Rifle Association)

Although it would be impossible to really know how many lives this program has saved, I’m sure the number is huge.

The NRA’s blog post – HERE

More about the NRA program – HERE

If your kids haven’t seen the video, the NRA actually has it available for free on YouTube:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIEBrb_wRYc[/youtube]

The cartoon is short and very entertaining.  I am shocked that it only has about 29,000 views!

Hat Tip: SayUncle

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[youtube width=”560″ height=”340″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TC2xTCb_GU[/youtube]

Any Australians that could provide some insight into how he has some of those guns?

I thought guns were highly restricted and auto ones effectively banned in Australia after the 1996 Port Arthur massacre, but then I saw that music video.

Wikipedia lists all the Australian firearms categories, notably this one:

Category R/E: restricted weapons: machine guns, rocket launchers, assault rifles, flame-throwers, anti-tank guns, Howitzers, artillery, .50-calibre BMG weapons, etc. (Collectors in some states only, weapons must be comprehensively deactivated. Deactivated firearms are still subject to the same storage and licensing requirements as ‘live’ firearms in many states.)
Source – HERE

The Sporting Shooters Association of Australia (SSAA) makes no mention of the R/E category anyone on their website – HERE

Another thing that I found odd in the music video was that Steve fly’s somewhere, presumably in Australia (because of the Right Hand Drive car) to purchase that car to shoot up.  But he pays with US currency… is that commonplace in Australia?  Maybe that last part with the automatic weapons and the rocket launchers was filmed here in the U.S.?

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