captor

This chart was in Newsweek magazine a few weeks ago:

It’s kind of hard to read the list on the graphic, so I retyped it:

  1. Don’t be a hero: Accept the situation and prepare to wait.
  2. Do what you’re told – and remember: the first 45 minutes are the most dangerous.
  3. Don’t speak unless spoken to, and then only when necessary
  4. Get comfortable, but never turn your back on your captor
  5. Don’t make suggestions: you’ll be blamed if the idea goes wrong.
  6. Don’t try to escape, unless your sure you’ll succeed and even then think twice.
  7. Let medical needs be known – but in a matter-of-fact way.
  8. Be observant: memorize captors’ names, identifying marks etc…
  9. Answer only “yes” or “no” if you end up fielding questions from authorities
  10. Signal the police if your captors are listening in on the line.
  11. Don’t be argumentative: treat your captors like royalty.
  12. Hit the floor: when help comes, stay down with your hands on your head.

Probably all good advice if you are willing to take the chance of dying at the hands of your captor.  Often though, you are going to have some pissed off captors on your hands once they figure out they are not getting all that they demand.  This has the potential to turn sour real quick and that’s when hostages start disappearing.

This is why I offer then 2 step solution to dealing with captors:

I know some of you are going to jump on me saying its not feasible in all situations, and I agree.   I’d rather take responsibility for my own life, rather than rolling the dice on whether or not Law Enforcement is going to surgically remove the scumbags before innocent people start dying.

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