challenge

Holy these are all incredibly annoying.  First up, a potato cannon:

All those shots look weak AF.  I’m one video in, and this guy’s voice is already hurting my brain like a rusty cheese grater.

Airsoft gun:

Meh. Probably quite painful, but doesn’t look that bad.

This actually looks incredibly painful while it’s happening, and the brusing at the ends looks really bad too.  Paintball gun:

Wow that was rough few videos to endure.  This guy has 120k followers on his YouTube channel.  Wow. His whole channel is “challenges” similar to this.

Thoughts? I don’t venture over to the “challenge” side of YouTube very often.. but when I see crap like this I’m always like “Oh yea no wonder people die

Gat tip: Blair

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Making guns, not the criminals who use them the problem… then trying to solve it.

Smart-Tech-Firearms-Challenge

Smart Tech for Firearms is the first in a four-challenge series designed to foster innovation to reduce gun violence. It is a request for proposals from innovators around the globe to submit an idea for technology that, when applied to a firearm, reliably recognizes an authorized user and blocks unauthorized use. At least $1 million will go directly toward innovators.

Source – Smart Tech Foundation

I’m not interested in expensive derpy smart guns that depend on technology that could easily fail or not work as intended.

A useless video with soothing piano music and some people talking about the challenge:

I wonder if that San Francisco police chief would be on board with his officers having smart guns?  AHAHHAHAHHAHAHAH right… but he expects the rest of us to have them to keep us safe.

You have until March 31, 2014 to submit your application to make the world a safer place with reduced gun violence.

Thoughts?

19 COMMENTS

The suit asserts: “At eighteen years of age, law-abiding citizens in this country are considered adults for almost all purposes and certainly for the purposes of the exercise of fundamental constitutional rights.

Full Story – HERE

At least some states allow private transfer of a handgun, or giving a handgun as a gift to an 18 year old.

6 COMMENTS

Retired Lt. Gen. Reginald Centracchio, the former head of the Rhode Island National Guard, gave 8-year-old David Morales a medal called a challenge coin during an appearance on WPRO-AM’s John DePetro show.

Centracchio said the second-grader should be thanked for recognizing veterans and soldiers.

“You did nothing wrong, and you did an outstanding job,” he said. “We can only hope that kids of your caliber will continue to defend this country.”

Centracchio also gave David a certificate that allows him to call himself a brigadier general.

Full Story – HERE

Nice!  Glad to see someone stepped up to the plate and thanked this kid.

Too bad David will probably be expelled from school now though because he now officially holds a high ranking position in the military according to the certificate he was given. I wonder if the O-7 pay comes with it?  That would buy a lot of toys. :P

Original post on the school’s ban of his hat – HERE

Hat Tip: PP

5 COMMENTS

DARPA_weather_balloon

On December 4th I blogged that DARPA was holding a competition (On Dec. 5th) where you could win $40000 in prize money.

My Predictions:

My guess is the correct answer is submitted in less than 30 minutes, on behalf of some sort of tightly knit organization.  It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

I wonder if anyone is planning on playing dirty and attaching a bunch of fake decoy balloons at various locations throughout the U.S. … If that is the case then maybe my prediction of 30 minutes isn’t realistic.

The Winner:

The Red Balloon Team of M.I.T. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

I find it unsurprising that M.I.T. won, considering the people that go there are obviously very intelligent.

What I do find surprising though is the lack of information released by M.I.T. or DARPA about the details on the network that was established that led to the win.

There is a useless PDF that the DARPA site links to – HERE and all it says it it took “less than 9 hours”.

The FAQ of the M.I.T. Red Balloon Team offers some insight into the process, but still doesn’t give any details about how many people ended up signing up and how they eventually won.

Kind of anti-climatic considering I thought there would be a lot of fake balloons launched, and other random hi-jinx.  Well maybe there was, but who knows, because like I mentioned earlier there seems to be absoultely no information about the progression of the contest.

Here is the map from DARPA on where they placed the 10 Balloons.  I wonder what their problem was with the central U.S.?

DarpaBalloonMap

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DARPA_weather_balloon

DARPA Network Challenge

The competition kicks off Dec. 5 at 10 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, when DARPA ( Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency ) will display 10 8-foot, red weather balloons at undisclosed, publicly accessible sites around the continental United States. The balloons will remain at their locations throughout the day, until sunset.

The first person to identify the precise latitudes and longitudes of all 10 balloons will win the prize money.

Norman Whitaker, deputy director of DARPA’s transformational convergence technology office, conceded that it would be nearly impossible for any one person to pinpoint every balloon within the designated timeframe. But if the competitors worked together as teams – using social networking forums made possible through the Internet – it is possible, he said.

My guess is the correct answer is submitted in less than 30 minutes, on behalf of some sort of tightly knit organization.  It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

I wonder if anyone is planning on playing dirty and attaching a bunch of fake decoy balloons at various locations throughout the U.S. … If that is the case then maybe my prediction of 30 minutes isn’t realistic.

Good luck to everyone that is participating.

More information on the contest – HERE

1 COMMENT