charged

Brigadier-General Daniel Ménard, who commands the Canadian and American troops who make up Task Force Kandahar, approached the media on Saturday, citing a need for openness, to say that his C8 carbine had fired unexpectedly at Kandahar air base on March 25th.

Full Story – HERE

I admire his coming forward and ordering an investigation on himself.  I’d assume that most, with such a high rank may have tried their hardest just to sweep it under the rug.  I guess the fact that he fired the rifle inside an American helicopter and almost hit a Canadian official probably made it a bit more of a big deal.

As you see in the title of the post I put “negligent” discharge, as opposed to it being a possible “accidental” discharge according to the article.  By my definition (and the definition of most) an accidental discharge is a mechanical failure of the weapon system, whereas a negligent discharge is a failure of the operator. Since the Brigadier-General was holding the rifle when it fired, I’d be willing to put my money on the fact that he had the safety off, and his booger hook on the bang switch.

I found the last paragraph in the article also interesting:

In the past 18 months, more than 600 Canadian Forces soldiers have been convicted of negligently discharging their weapons. Most of those incidents involve junior soldiers or recruits and many of them an instance of pulling the trigger prematurely during firing range practice.

Convicted?  So soldiers and recruits get convicted of a negligent discharge even if they are practicing on a the shooting range and the shot goes down range?  Although I don’t like the idea of a shot going ANYWHERE that is unintentional, I think it’s kind of harsh to tarnish the permanent record of a soldier that is still learning in cases where no one got hurt, and there was absolutely no chance of someone being hurt.  I wonder how a ND during training will affect their military career?  Seeing as retention is key in military organizations, this seems like a good way to lose soldiers.

600 ND’s in a year and a half seems like quite a lot, regardless of where they are occurring.

More info on the C8 carbine at Colt Canada – HERE

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