luggage

Herititage luggage manufacturer Globe-Trotter produced this rifle case for the latest James Bond film SKYFALL.

Limited to just 100 editions globally, this case is one of the most exclusive products in Globe-Trotter’s history. This slim line 26″ aluminium suitcase has been formed by hand in England, and features a telescopic sight handle which is a replica of the one used in SKYFALL. Internally, the case is beautifully finished with a diamond quilted Alcantara lining and commemorative internal plaque.

Classy.  Expensive though at £5,000 ($8070 USD)

Globe-Trotter has other items in the James Bond collection as well, but they don’t have any scope in the handle type gimmicks… everything is just black.

Last but not least Adele kills it on the theme:

Yea I like Adele, that’s some real talent right there… deal with it bros. ;)

SKYFALL’s Release date is November 9, 2012 … mark it on your calendars.

Thoughts?

15 COMMENTS

Hello my name is Mike, and I am addicted to bags.

That is how my introduction would go at group addictions counseling.

Next to guns and watches, bags are my next biggest interest.  I have all types and brands, ranging in size, material, and price, from very cheap up to several hundred dollars.

I recently received a carbon fiber airstream duffel bag from my site sponsor Ragged Edge.

The company makes all their own products right here in the U.S.A., in Clearwater Florida.  Refreshing, considering all of my other bags are made abroad.

No pictures or description can do the bag justice.  It is one of those products that you will never fully appreciate until you are able to handle, and use it.

It’s no wonder they offer a lifetime warranty on their products. Judging by the material used, the design of the bag, and the way it is constructed, I highly doubt that with even the most rigorous use there would ever be any damage inflicted that would require having to return it for repair.

The bag is made from carbon fiber sailcloth, it’s definitely not your average “cloth” though. The best way I can think of to describe the material, would be to say it’s like handling a really thick rain jacket.  This particular sailcloth also has the interesting quality of being partially translucent between the carbon fiber strip pattern.

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7 COMMENTS

A study published in the journal Current Biology looks into the problems involved in visually searching for exceedingly rare targets and comes to an unsettling conclusion: “If you don’t find it often, you often don’t find it,” says study author Jeremy Wolfe. In other words, we are not very good at finding things that are rarely there.

In one experiment, Wolfe took 20 X-rayed images of luggage stuffed with guns and knives, and mixed those images into stacks of images of X-rayed luggage that didn’t have guns and knives.

“If you stick those 20 bags into a stack of 40 bags, so on average there’s a gun and knife in 50 percent of the bags,” Wolfe says, “people missed about 7 percent of the bags.”

But when he took the exact same 20 bags and stuck them in a stack of 2,000 bags so that the targets showed up only 2 percent of the time, people got significantly worse. “All of a sudden, people were missing about 30 percent of the bags,” Wolfe says.

Full Story – HERE

Doesn’t inspire much confidence when it comes to the TSA’s screening.

5 COMMENTS