silhouette

Not sure if serious:

An academic study published by University of Illinois researchers drew together findings from 42 different studies on trigger bias to examine whether race affects how likely a target is to be shot.

“In our study we found two main things: First, people were quicker to shoot black targets with a gun, relative to white targets with a gun. And … people were more trigger-happy when shooting black targets compared to shooting white targets.”

Cool study bro. So black targets have nothing to do with contrast and being able to spot hits, and have EVERYTHING to do with racism.  Got it.

This is too much haha. You can check out the No More Black Targets site, if you want to go down that rabbit hole.

Thoughts?

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Disregard females, cut black paper action scenes then photograph them:

From David Reeves, an artist from Halifax, NS Canada.

Looks like a lot of work.  If I had a laser cutter I would have used that to save time rather than an x-acto knife.

Hat tip: Geekologie

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Sunset over Manhattan:

(Source)

Pretty neat how a pile of strategically placed shot-up garbage can cast a familiar looking shadow.

I’m disappointed that there is no artist provided “deep meaning”  behind this painting so i’ll make my own:

The urban silhouette cast by the shot up garbage represents the struggle man has with industrialism, only worsening with each rise of the morning sun.

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A 50-year-old man was mistaken for a target and accidentally shot during an exercise at Gunsite Academy’s training facility in Paulden Arizona, authorities said.

Full Story – HERE
 
OOPS… Somebody needs new glasses! That’s a negligent discharge at its finest.  According to the article the man is is “good” condition, hopefully he recovers quickly.

I wonder what caliber he got hit with? There are a lot of important things in the abdomen, it’s a miracle he is still alive.

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DeweaponizingTheGun

His work, created by shooting bullets into reinforced aluminum and generating a patterned silhouette effect, Creel admits the process drained him, “I started off just going into the woods with canvas, then realized I needed a stronger material.” Taking nearly a full year to develop his current technique and the resulting first piece (an image of a deer) Creel took time off before continuing to work on the remaining pieces of his series.

Doesn’t sound very exhausting to me, but I’m not an artist.

More about the artist Walton Creel and his work – HERE

Hat Tip: SayUncleBlog

Note to self:
Create abstract art by bumpfiring into a pile of scrap metal and paint and profit

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