WWI

The Pedersen Device is an attachment developed during World War I for the M1903 Springfield rifle that allowed it to fire a short 0.30 (7.62 mm) caliber intermediate cartridge in semi-automatic mode. This wonder weapon was developed to allow infantry to dramatically increase their rate of fire while on the move, while also allowing the rifle to be used in conventional bolt action mode for long-range fire from the trenches.

Wiki page with lots more info – HERE

This very rare collectors item is up for auction, with a starting bid (or buy now?) of $23000

It does not include a magazine, so you’d have to procure one before you got to use this beauty. I’m sure anyone that would pay $23,000 for this device probably wouldn’t be shooting with it though.

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Almost a century ago and without the aid of any pixel-generating computer software, the itinerant photographer Arthur Mole (1889-1983) used his 11 x 14-inch view camera to stage a series of extraordinary mass photographic spectacles that choreographed living bodies into symbolic formations of religious and national community. In these mass ornaments, thousands of military troops and other groups were arranged artfully to form American patriotic symbols, emblems, and military insignia visible from a bird’s eye perspective. During World War I, these military formations came to serve as rallying points to support American involvement in the war and to ward off isolationist tendencies.

More Info – HERE

Lots more pictures – HERE

*Click them to view full-size*
(The photographs appear to be on display at the Hammer Gallery in Chicago, IL)


Simply amazing; the use of perspective is incredible. It would be neat to see this done again.

I wonder if there was a lot of complaining back then? I’m sure there would be plenty today if soldiers were ordered to be involved in this type of project.

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