Blind Concealed Carry In Kansas

Kansas legislators during the last session approved a number of changes to the state’s concealed carry law. One of them was that people who are renewing their license no longer have to take any sort of test to prove they’re still proficient with a firearm.

The changes also removed language from the law that gave the attorney general the right to deny applicants a license if they “suffer from a physical infirmity which prevents the safe handling of a weapon.”

Full Story – HERE

I know there is a difference between not seeing anything at all and being legally blind.  I’m all for equal rights, but if a person potentially can’t see what they are shooting at 100% of the time… giving them a gun sounds like a bad idea to me.

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Motor-T February 16, 2011 at 02:06 am

“I’m all for equal rights, but if a person potentially can’t see what they are shooting at 100% of the time… giving them a gun sounds like a bad idea to me.”
Giving a gun to a blind person seems like a poor gift idea to me too. Does your state give out guns to CCW license holders?

My father has held a Texas concealed handgun license for some time now. He has recently been declared legally blind. He can still see a target out to 5 or so yards. He practices regularly, and has even shot a couple of IDPA matches, beating out “sighted” shooters. He knows his limitations, and practices accordingly. I would hate to see him disarmed by the state. If his vision degrades to the point that he cannot practice, he has told me that he would probably stop carrying, but his wife (a pretty tough gal) would still continue to carry.

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Paranoid in Montana February 16, 2011 at 06:38 pm

What if I’ve got Parkensons? Or what if some doctor declares that I shouldn’t have one. Legally blind people may not be able to shoot yet, but some of the new implants they are coming up with could allow them to shoot even if they are legally blind. Excluding rights from any group is always a slippery slope.

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Admin (Mike) February 16, 2011 at 07:22 pm

I think it all boils down to the hope that people would have the common sense to police themselves. If you have Parkinson’s and there is a danger of you discharging the gun prematurely because of your own nervous system which you have no control over, then I’d say you should be making the right decision which would be to stop handling objects or using items that could result in unintentionally harming someone.

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McSmartypants June 29, 2011 at 07:27 pm

Yeah, and people are famous for always making the right decisions when it comes to guns, right? :p

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