brass

Terminal Lance knows what’s up. He took this, which happens to the best of us:

And made a comic out of it:

Seriously though, if you’re not following Terminal Lance what are you doing with your life?  I’d say it’s every bit as crucial to survival as ENDO.

7 COMMENTS

The video needs more bikini girl (1:57) and less dudes.

Question: Does it work?
Answer: Looks like it.

Question: Will I look like an idiot?
Answer: Definitely.

When I originally heard of the idea I was expecting something cooler than a creepy leather glove with an aluminum supported net. I want to see 2 of these in a movie, on a gangster shooting a DEAGLE in each hand then fleeing from the cops.

The Brass Grabber is $50 – HERE

20 COMMENTS

From AR15.com user ObsoleteMan:

It started with some inspiration from the video game “Army Of Two”.
The main characters use weapons equipped with shields.
I thought these gun-shields were an innovative, if not entirely practical, idea.

The functional components: A railed AR, Havoc 37mm Flare Launcher, Beta C-Mag

Extra components: Molded plastic grip with horizontal & vertical gripping points.

« Click to continue…

36 COMMENTS

CoBIS

Combined Ballistic Identification System

A system where the shell casing of a bullet, (or brass) from a fired round is supplied by a gun manufacturer in an approved container shipped with a new handgun that is shipped to the NY State Police when the gun is sold or if the new handgun is shipped to the Federal Firearms License holder, the FFL takes the gun to the State Police Lab to be test fired and the lab keeps the shell casing and the fired bullet.

  • The shell casing is scanned into a computer data base to be compared against shell casing recovered from a crime location.
  • This program has has NO success in NY while costing $4,000,000 to start and an estimated $4,000,000 a year to maintain or an average cost of about $200 per legal gun.
  • CoBIS only collects information from legal guns that are new and have not been linked to a crime and the size of the data base in New York alone is in 10s of thousands of guns and will, within the first 3 years included almost 66,000 data files with almost 22,000 new handguns being added each year. (Source)

Questions:

  1. This program is been around for 8 years and has had no success… so why is it still sucking up millions of tax payers money?
  2. Does the shell casing always has to be matched to striations (marks from the guns rifling) on a bullet found lodged in something at the scene, and both of those tied back to the gun?  Or is it considered enough evidence if just two out of three are available?
  3. Why would someone that is legally buying a gun want to take the risk of being in a database such as CoBIS?
  4. Should we all take collecting our own brass at the range a lot more seriously if systems like this are going to be used to assign guilt?
  5. Doesn’t the firing pin, and barrel rifling slightly change over time with normal wear?  How is this taken into account?
  6. We know that criminals can pick up their casings at a scene, modify the rifling of the gun, modify the firing pin to produce a different imprint.  So why have a costly system that is rendered useless if even one of those happens?
  7. Since New York isn’t an impenetrable fortress, where nothing can get in or out. What use is this database if a criminal can just bring in a gun from another state to commit a crime?

Hat Tip: Say Uncle

4 COMMENTS

R Lee Ermey from the History Channel show Lock & Load:

RLeeErmey1

RLeeErmey1

HearingPro40

Making your own:

What I Did:
I started off with my favorite set of ear plugs The Com-fit AB corded ear plugs. DB 26 rating.

Then took my Px4 outside and fired 2 rounds into the hillside as to retrieve 2 spent .40 s&w casing (winchester 165 gr target ammo; 100 rnds $30 @ walmart). all my other brass i pawned at the gun shop for a few bucks.

Took a small nail; and hammer (because im too lazy to dig out my fathers reloading equipment) and gently taped, from the inside, removing the primer from both shells.

using a drill bit fed into the hole in the ear plug (ment for the cord) and put the ear plug into the casing, bit thru the primer hole, and filled it with hot glue from a glue gun. (WARNING CASING WILL BECOME HOT; use a vice or gloves when doing this step)

now on the .40 i had to drill the primer hole out a slight bit as it was too small for the cord to fit through. i then threaded the cord in thru the rear of the casing and viola…. spent casing ear plugs. novelty and hearing protection brought together as one.

Note: cord is NOT needed; but helpful to keep from loosing them. Also it helps secure the ear plug into the casing as it might slide back out after the glue settles (in testing it was rare but did happen; some super glue on top of this wouldn’t go amiss; however with the cord i don’t have that problem at all)

Source – mXm Community

1 COMMENT

This happened at the 2009 US Nationals – Stage 5, Production.   Pretty neat!  I’m sure this does not happen very often.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuqeGq-ZkKw[/youtube]

COMMENT