TSA

An anonymous account from a U.S. Army soldier returning from Afghanistan:

So we’re in line, going through one at a time. One of our Soldiers had his Gerber multi-tool. TSA confiscated it. Kind of ridiculous, but it gets better. A few minutes later, a guy empties his pockets and has a pair of nail clippers. Nail clippers. TSA informs the Soldier that they’re going to confiscate his nail clippers.

The conversation went something like this:

TSA Guy: You can’t take those on the plane.

Soldier: What? I’ve had them since we left country.

TSA Guy: You’re not suppose to have them.

Soldier: Why?

TSA Guy: They can be used as a weapon.

Soldier: [touches butt stock of the rifle] But this actually is a weapon. And I’m allowed to take it on.

TSA Guy: Yeah but you can’t use it to take over the plane. You don’t have bullets.

Soldier: And I can take over the plane with nail clippers?

TSA Guy: [awkward silence]

Me: Dude, just give him your damn nail clippers so we can get the f**k out of here. I’ll buy you a new set.

Soldier: [hands nail clippers to TSA guy, makes it through security]

This might be a good time to remind everyone that approximately 233 people re-boarded that plane with assault rifles, pistols, and machine guns-but nothing that could have been used as a weapon.

(Source)

All in the name of national security…

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No one likes the TSA rules, mainly because they are not logical. That said, if you are planning on flying you need to abide by them or you simply will not get on the plane.  Because of this I just grin and bear it in order to get pushed through the line faster and get where I need to go.

Fellow gun blogger SaysUncle is trying a different approach though:

I’m going to get all absolutist at the ticket counter today. They’re going to ask me to certify that my checked firearm is unloaded. I will say all firearms are always loaded. Then they’ll have to call some one from the local police to handle the weapon. Then, they’ll ask me to certify that it is unloaded again. I will say all firearms are always loaded. And we’ll be stuck in a loop. (Source)

Now don’t get me wrong.. in a normal everyday situation outside of an airport I’d see that as a perfect opportunity to go all “Jeff Cooper” on someones ass too.

At an airport though, where even a 3.1 oz bottle of handsanitizer in a carryon is a threat to national security… I’d play their stupid game.

Otherwise it might be:

“Yes sir/ma’am my firearm is unloaded” is probably your safest bet.

Godspeed SaysUncle… Godspeed

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Two 9 millimeters, plus loads of bullets — 300 of them — and holsters to go with them, somehow got on board an Egypt Air flight out of JFK on Tuesday night. No one knew anything about the guns Mohammed Ibrahim stashed in his checked luggage until they were discovered in Cairo.

Full Story – HERE

Ooops.. someone at the TSA is going to get in trouble for that one. Interesting how a University professor would try and pull a stunt like that… you’d think he would be smarter.  Plus if he’s traveling to another country I believe he would have to get a temporary import permit from that country, and an authorization to export from the U.S. …. maybe he had all those, but figured his work was done and didn’t bother to take the last required security steps at the airport?

Hat Tip: Bryce

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Using a modified version of Newton’s cradle, a series of stainless steel balls suspended by fishing wire, scientists from the California Institute of Technology have created a powerful weapon for soldiers and doctors known as a “sound bullet.”

Full Story – HERE

Luckily the article goes onto say that metamaterials ( which is what they refer to this field of science as ) are very difficult and time consuming to create.  Hopefully the TSA doesn’t blow this out of proportion or we will all be flying naked soon with gags in our mouths over fear of acoustic terrorism.

It will be interesting to see what new inventions and applications come out of this.

Hat Tip: SayUncle

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A study published in the journal Current Biology looks into the problems involved in visually searching for exceedingly rare targets and comes to an unsettling conclusion: “If you don’t find it often, you often don’t find it,” says study author Jeremy Wolfe. In other words, we are not very good at finding things that are rarely there.

In one experiment, Wolfe took 20 X-rayed images of luggage stuffed with guns and knives, and mixed those images into stacks of images of X-rayed luggage that didn’t have guns and knives.

“If you stick those 20 bags into a stack of 40 bags, so on average there’s a gun and knife in 50 percent of the bags,” Wolfe says, “people missed about 7 percent of the bags.”

But when he took the exact same 20 bags and stuck them in a stack of 2,000 bags so that the targets showed up only 2 percent of the time, people got significantly worse. “All of a sudden, people were missing about 30 percent of the bags,” Wolfe says.

Full Story – HERE

Doesn’t inspire much confidence when it comes to the TSA’s screening.

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Most of the time, travelers are on the short-end of TSA regulations. In this instance, however, you can use travel rules to your advantage. If you’re traveling with equipment you would prefer locked up and watched more closely than your run of the mill luggage, you can pack a firearm with the equipment or luggage.

Whether or not you own an actual firearm isn’t important—the TSA considers a starter pistol a firearm, and it must be checked in and secured properly.

Something to consider.  It sounds like it just might work!

Source – Lifehacker

2 COMMENTS